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How to Thrive in the Summer Conditions

In this article, we go through the ins and outs of how to successfully thrive while working in the bush during the summertime. 


From hot weather conditions to nasty bugs 

Did you know, when a person's temperature control system — sweating to cool down the body — doesn't work, heat exhaustion progresses to heat stroke. A person's body temperature can rise so high that it can cause brain damage and death if the body is not cooled quickly.[1]

Here are a couple of things you can do to keep cool in warm weather conditions while working in the field: 

  1. Make sure to stay hydrated when on the job. If possible, pack a cooler with water and always bring more water than you expect to drink. To keep the cooler contents cold, freeze water bottles and drink them once they thaw  

  2. Always wear a hat to protect yourself from the sun. This can also be soaked with water to keep cool.

  3. Wear loose-fitting clothing, this will allow your body to sweat regularly making it easier for your body to regulate temperatures

  4. Apply sunscreen generously and reapply every two hours. Sunburns inhibit the bodies ability to cool itself, which is why it's so important to stay covered with a hat & clothing and to apply at least SPF 15 every 2 hours or more often if you're sweating

  5. Invest in UPF clothing. Spending a bit of extra money on very light long sleeve clothes with some UPF rating. Many people want to wear short-sleeved shirts, but often the extra protection from the sun, as long as the long-sleeve shirt is very breathable, is worth it.

TIP: If you sew a flap of fabric from an old shirt onto the back of your hat so it hangs down about 6 inches, it keeps spruce needles and bugs from falling down your back. You can also wet the fabric with your water bottle to keep your neck and back cool in warm weather. 

Don't forget: always be self-aware when working outside. If you feel you've gotten too much sun, find some shade and drink water to regain proper orientation before proceeding to the task at hand. In serious cases, notify your safety supervisor for specific situational circumstances. 


BUGS, no thank you.

Bugs are also a MASSIVE inconvenience when working in the bush. Mosquitos especially, really hinder foresters' ability to properly execute their duties. Did you know, only female mosquitoes feed on animal or human blood? They need blood in order to produce eggs. [2]

Here are a couple of things you can do to limit the hindrance of bugs while on the job:

  1. Always bring bug spray to repel mosquitos when on the job. Bug spray containing DEET (N,N-diethyl-meta-toluamide) is the most effective ingredient to repel the insects. 

  2. Consider a Bug Lotion to prevent insect bites. Very handy for an extra layer of bug repellant! 

  3. Wear loose clothing to prevent bugs from biting through your clothes

  4. Avoid perfumes, colognes, fragrant hair sprays, lotions and soaps which attract mosquitos.

  5. Try Permethrin fabric spray. When a tick, mosquito, or other insect comes into contact with Permethrin, it absorbs a dose that will either repel or kill the insect. [3] This product is for clothing ONLY. Be careful to not apply Permethrin directly to your skin.


Sawyer Permethrin insect repellent for clothing gear: 

https://sawyer.com/products/permethrin-insect-repellent-treatment/




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About Forteck

 Our founder, Branden Soroka, grew up in the outdoors as a young child starting with snowmobiling and checking traps on his grandfather's trapline. Branden learned the ropes of the forest industry...

  

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